US Govt Requests Blockchain Solutions for Upcoming Workshop

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The U.S. government has announced that it is seeking proposals for innovative solutions to aid in its efforts to facilitate greater “transparency, accountability, participation, and/or technological innovation” at the federal level. Would-be partners are invited to participate in a workshop on September 8 as part of the General Services Administration’s Emerging Citizen Technology Program.

The Emerging Citizen Technology Program is a GSA-directed initiative designed to leverage new technologies to modernize public services. Working with experts in government, tech startups, and other private sector organizations, the program seeks “practical use cases” for new technologies such as artificial intelligence, virtual reality, and the blockchain.

According to the post, the goal is to use these technologies to improve citizen participation in a more transparent and open government. The announcement is an open call to potential partners, inviting them to aid the government as it prepares its next U.S. National Action Plan for Open Government:

“Participants in this workshop, including U.S. businesses, federal managers, civil society groups and researchers, are directed to draft proposals that specifically use artificial intelligence, blockchain and/or open data to advance federal government transparency, accountability, participation, and/or technological innovation. Goals must also introduce a new, ambitious open government initiative, and all goals must be entirely new to the U.S. government or include a new element that was not part of a past initiative.”

The views expressed by the authors on this site do not necessarily represent the views of DCEBrief or the management team.

Author: Ken Chase

Freelance writer whose interests include topics ranging from technology and finance to politics, fitness, and all things canine. Aspiring polymath, semi-professional skeptic, and passionate advocate for the judicious use of the Oxford comma.

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